5 Questions Inspired by Tigers Be Still with Trevor Fayle

We asked the cast and crew of Tigers Be Still to answer 5 questions inspired by the play. Here’s how Trevor Fayle, who plays Zach (with a Z), responded. 

1) What is a movie that you could watch over and over again?
I could watch The Empire Strikes back twice a day if given the chance.  Because I am Trevor Fayle, King of the Nerds.
2) Which TOP GUN character do you most identify with and why?
I can’t say I much Identify with any of them, but if I had to pick one I’d say Kenny Loggins, because I too have a fondness for zones of a dangerous nature.
3) How do you take care of yourself after a break up (or when you feel down)? 
 Me after a bad breakup is not a pretty sight.  I watch a lot of anime, blast linkin park like it’s 2005, and develop a healthy love for the acoustic guitar.
Image
4) Describe your first job.
My first job was teaching kids how to ski.  Pizza! French fry!
5) Have you ever been up close and personal with a wild animal? How did it go for you?
 For sure.  I grew up in the untamed wilderness of western Massachusetts.  I have a lot of stories about bears, deer, moose and geese.  Believe it or not the latter involves the most danger.

This will be Trevor’s second show with Azuka, and first one on the Azuka stage! He could not be happier to be here working on the production of Tigers Be Still! Previous credits most recently include Emma at the Lantern and Owners with Inversion Theatre Co.

5 Questions Inspired by Tigers Be Still with Felicia Leicht

We asked the cast and crew of Tigers Be Still to answer 5 questions inspired by the play. Here’s how Felicia Leicht, who plays Grace, responded. 
1) What is a movie that you could watch over and over again?
There are a bunch.  Ones that I have watched countless times? Jaws, Empire Strikes Back, Moonstruck, The Iron Giant, just to name a few.  But if we’re going with guilty pleasure 80s romantic movie, I’d have to say: Dirty Dancing.Image
2) Which TOP GUN character do you most identify with and why?
I’d have to say Carole (the Meg Ryan character).  She has nothing to do with the flying, and she loves Goose (who is by far my favorite character in the movie.)
3) How do you take care of yourself after a break up (or when you feel down)? 
Depends on the type of heartbreak.  In some cases, I haven’t wanted to eat a thing, and just want to watch fluffy, brain candy TV and movies to distract myself.  But that’s more of the exception.  My usual pick-me-up is the fluffy viewing material combined with eating all my favorite foods: spaghetti and meatballs, chocolate, etc.  And soup.  I always find soup comforting.
4) Describe your first job.
My first job was babysitting, and my first paid gig involved caring for a three year old and a one year old from 6:30pm until one in the morning, when I was only twelve years old.  I couldn’t believe it.  I knew myself to be fairly responsible for a twelve year old, but I still couldn’t fathom how parents could possibly entrust their two small children to someone so young, well into the middle of the night.
5) Have you ever been up close and personal with a wild animal? How did it go for you?
I can’t really say that I have.  I always enjoyed the zoo as a kid, but was not much hiking, camping, or generally venturing out into the wild.  The beach and the ocean have always been my preferred type of nature.  The closest experience I have is probably having a school of dolphins swim right past me, less than ten feet away, while I was swimming down the shore.  I just wish one of them had taken me for a ride.
Felicia is a recent graduate of Villanova University’s Graduate Theater program where she was an acting scholar and a recipient of the Brian G. Morgan Award. She has performed regionally with Philadelphia Artists Collective, Shakespeare in Clark Park, Commonwealth Classic Theatre Company, Plays and Players, and the National Constitution Center among others, and has also co-created and performed original works for the Philadelphia Live Arts, Philly Fringe, and Berkshire Fringe Festivals. Next up, she will be appearing in Revolution Shakespeare’s Five Kings.

5 Questions Inspired By Tigers Be Still: Jared Michael Delaney

We asked the cast and crew of Tigers Be Still to answer 5 questions inspired by the play. First up, Jared Michael Delaney, who plays Joseph.
1) What is a movie that you could watch over and over again?
The Thing (the John Carpenter version). Don’t know what it is exactly, but I’ve seen it a million times and love it every time.
2) Which Top Gun character do you most identify with and why?
I don’t know if I identify with him exactly, but I like Viper (played by Tom Skerritt, probably because I like Tom Skerritt as an actor so much.)  And you cannot deny the Iceman.
3) How do you take care of yourself after a break up (or when you feel down)?
The saddest of sad songs and the angriest of angry songs.
4) Describe your first job
My first job was washing dishes at a Denny’s-like diner. It was a living hell, particularly on Sundays, when it was the post-church senior citizen discount brunch rush. But we listened to Rock 107, The Mountain, in the kitchen, so I received a thorough education in Bad Company, Foreigner and other mid-late 70s bands that sucked. So call that a win.
5) Have you ever been up close and personal with a wild animal? How did it go for you?
I once encountered a wild California Brown Bear in Lake Tahoe in a hotel parking lot around 1am. It was the size of a Volkswagon and as he shuffled across the parking lot, he seemed to turn towards me, give an indifferent shrug and continue on his way. I learned the next morning that this particular bear came down from the mountains every night to forage through the trash. The hotel owners told me they used to chain lock the garbage cans, but the bear would just break the locks. So they stopped locking them. Let’s repeat that: the bear used to BREAK THE STEEL LOCKS, cause he could. So I, in turn, am grateful for his indifference on that evening.
Image
Image: Roberta Olenick/All Canada Photos/Getty Images

Jared is the Associate Artistic Director of Inis Nua Theatre Company and co-founder of Revolution Shakespeare. As an actor, he has worked regionally with the Folger Theater, Arden Theatre Company, Philadelphia Theatre Company, Walnut Street Theatre, Sierra Rep. Theater, River Valley Rep., Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival, Lantern Theater, Theatre Workshop of Nantucket, the Theatre at Monmouth and Azuka Theatre, among others. He has twice been nominated for “Best Ensemble” at Philly’s Barrymore Awards (winning once). As a playwright, he has had three short plays produced as part of the Philadelphia FringeArts Festival. The Hand of Gaul, his first full-length play, was produced by Inis Nua Theatre Company in April 2013

From the Actress–New Plays with Maureen Torsney-Weir

By Maureen Torsney-Weir
So what’s it like to live in one of Jacqueline Goldfinger’s fabulous, complex, characters? In short – it’s like getting the best Christmas/birthday/pick your holiday present ever!!! I’ve been blessed to play Midge in Skin & Bone, Jackie’s second play in her southern Gothic trilogy that premiered at Azuka Theatre just 2 weeks ago!
 Image
Drucie McDaniels (left) and Maureen Torsney-Weir in Skin and Bone
I work a lot on new plays. I love new plays and I’ve learned a lot about acting by working in new plays. When my children were young,  I couldn’t do more than one play a year but I could do play readings. I signed up with a bunch (well, four) of playwright groups in New York and Connecticut (where I lived at the time) to agree to perform in their reading series. What an education!!! The plays would come in the mail and I’d have a week (or less) to work on the character that I was playing for the reading. I learned to see what the playwright intended, and not to want to rewrite their play. I learned about structure, language, character development, and most of all, how the story was being told to the audience. Jackie is a master of all of the above. I especially love her use of language. There are so many wonderful interior rhythms. It’s a joy to work on this play.
There are lots of clues to Midge’s character and some are more obvious (like her family traditions) but some are delicious little treats hidden within the lines. For example – several times Midge mentions  phrases like: “you can have it next year” or “I’m gonna die here…” which lend an urgency to her wanting to keep her home and a desperation to her fights with Ronnie. The play is full of treats like that, but I don’t want to give it all away. You’ll have to come and see us!

Meet Kevin Meehan

Azuka snagged the chance to ask a few Failure: A Love Story related questions of our cast and crew.
So…without further ado…

Meet Kevin Meehan (Mortimer Mortimer)

What is your favorite time of day?

The hour of the pearl. The moment between day and night when time seems to stop and examine itself. – for all you Steinbeck fans, a little nod.

Describe one thing you had to share with your siblings.

When we were both of age, my brother and I had to share the family car. It was an 1989 maroon Plymouth voyager. The thing lasted forever. But once I was able to drive it became somewhat a point of contention. Also it was the car my father used so his need trumped both of ours. Also this meant we had to drive my younger sister places.

What is one other book, film, song, or work of art that reminds you of ‘Failure’ and why?

Rothko paintings. They’re self contained and totally engulfing. You stand there and stare into the color and it wraps itself around you. Like a memory. And looking at a Rothko you only have the memory of the moment before which is the color and that leads you to the next moment which is the color. It’s like a snake eating its own tail.

What is your favorite moment when working on a new production?

When you get to the point where you know the piece well enough to know what you don’t know.

Any childhood pets?

Yeah – we had a bunch. At least 3 hamsters, hermit crabs, a turtle. But the dog I grew up with was the best. Her name was jasmine and she was this brown mutt with a weird lump on her head. She was calm and lovable and I was probably a little rough with her was I was little and wanted to play. I’ll never forget the day in the 5th grade when we had to put her down. She was just old and everything was failing her. We kids said our goodbyes and went to school while my dad took her to the vet.

Kevin Meehan (Mortimer Mortimer)

Kevin Meehan (Mortimer Mortimer)

Meet Brendan Dalton

Azuka snagged the chance to ask a few Failure: A Love Story related questions of our cast and crew.
So…without further ado…

Meet Brendan Dalton (John N. Fail)

What is your favorite time of day?

I love the dawn. There is something so calming about waking up before the rest of the world, and being completely overtaken by the stillness and the silence of the morning twilight.

Nap time is a winner as well. We’re starting to get reacquainted again, and it’s just wonderful.

Describe one thing you had to share with your siblings.

Sharing was a funny thing growing up with my brother, Sean. It seemed like everything I had, he wanted. And everything he had, I wanted. And we weren’t very good at having one thing at the same time, peacefully. I remember when my brother was going through his skateboarding phase… Guess who also had to have a skateboard: Brendan, the trumpet-playing chorus nerd. Though I think I ended up using it more as a luge than as an actual skateboard. I also remember using it as a sidewalk sled when I was still small enough to be tugged around by my puppy, Seamus.

There’s actually still a running joke between me and my brother about our sharing dilemma. I used to always find him wearing clothes that would mysteriously go missing from my closet, and he would try to convince me the items never belonged to me in the first place. Eventually, he told me I should just take it as a compliment on my “style”. Now every time I see him he always finds time to say, “Hey Brendan, nice shirt. Can I have it?”

What is one other book, film, song, or work of art that reminds you of ‘Failure’ and why?

The Royal Tenenbaums is one of my favorite films. And Wes Anderson is one of my favorite writers. I think there are quite a few similarities in these two works. Both writers really have an interesting and similar approach to telling stories, which I’m personally very drawn to, and both pieces also have very distinct and dark senses of humor, which I’m also very fond of. Also, there happen to be a few similarities between my character and Luke Wilson’s character inTenenbaums. That’s all I’m gonna say about that.

What is your favorite moment when working on a new production?

I love the first read-thru. I love hearing other people’s voices instead of my own, bringing the piece to life for the first time. There’s something sort of sacred about that first read – probably the first real moment of unity in the process, where you’re all truly on the same page (pun kind of intended). And you can feel it completely.

I also love getting the piece on its feet. Once you’re up on your feet, it feels like a million possibilities have just opened themselves up to you. You don’t have to think so much anymore. You just get to try things and it fully becomes an exploration.

Any childhood pets?

Oh boy, I hope I remember them all… Five goldfish whose names have escaped me. Three hermit crabs: Spike 1, Spike 2, and Crabby (I got to name that last one). One hamster named Skippy, who loved shirt pockets and yogurt drops. Two parakeets named Sunshine and Rainbow (Sunshine was mine, Rainbow was Sean’s). Two rabbits, Thumper and Lily (a dwarf rabbit), who just loved hopping up and down stairs (though Lily never quite got the hang of it, being small and all). And one very dear friend, brother, and canine named Seamus.

Also, I now have two blueberry dwarf hamsters, Plop and Mervyn, living with me in my South Philly apartment.

Brendan Dalton (John N.)

Brendan Dalton (John N.)

Meet Isa St. Clair

Azuka snagged the chance to ask a few Failure: A Love Story related questions of our cast and crew.
So…without further ado…

Meet Isa St. Clair (Gerty Fail)

What is your favorite time of day?

While there’s no number for my favorite time of day, there is a word for it: hypnagogic! The hypnagogic state takes place in that cloudy place between sleeping and waking, and it is my favorite time of day twice a day, both at the morning and at night.

Describe one thing you had to share with your siblings.

I was one of those younger siblings who, at least until teenager-hood, idolized her older brother. So sharing was awesome! Even though I had my own toys, my own spaces, my own schedule, I always wanted share whatever Paul had. I had my own room, but I shared his bunk bed. I had my own toys, but I made him share his chemistry set. I had the backyard fort I’d made myself, but I clambered into his treehouse and shared that too. When Paul did a cool school project, I did the same one at home. He once spent a week researching and capturing click beetles for the 5th grade Bug Fair; I spent that whole week combing the yard for beetles too. For me, sharing was a form of flattery. How better to tell Paul that he was the coolest older brother ever than to force myself into his world and make him share? Right?

What is one other book, film, song, or work of art that reminds you of ‘Failure’ and why?

When auditioning for Failure, we were asked to bring in a song. I chose to do a short ukulele rendition of Lisa Hannigan’s “Safe Travels,” a song that, to me, completely captures the sweet and tragic link between loving and dying. The lyrics caution safety in a series of escalating potential threats (we start with “please eat your greens” and end with “the gasoline pump’s not a toy), ending in a chorus of “Safe travels, don’t die.” It’s very funny, but also kind of heartbreaking. You worry about someone because you love them. And when you love someone, you can’t bear to lose them. But it happens. It does. And that’s just how it goes. So all we can hope for are safe travels.

Lisa Hannigan – Safe Travels (Official HD Video)

What is your favorite moment when working on a new production?

My first instinct is to say that my favorite moments of working on a show are the big unifying moments – having an audience in the room for the first time, or seeing the tech components light up our ideas for the first time, but I think it’s actually a little simpler than that. I think my favorite moment of working on a show is the first read through. There is nothing quite like being in a room with the artistic team and saying the words out loud for the first time. The incredible possibility is palpable. And that’s what I love: the first steps of the journey. Don’t get me wrong, the rest of the journey is incredible as well. But a first read has the magic of beginning. And for a play like Failure, which explores the beginning inherent in every ending, there’s something deeply beautiful in the first beginning.

Any childhood pets?

My brother and I were always animal lovers, both of us more like John N. than any other character in Failure. We had your standards – a dog and a cat – but we also went through three hooded rats, a cockatiel, a herd of hermit crabs, and a ferret, not to mention the efts, beetles, and garter snakes that we would temporarily abduct from the backyard and house in one of our many terraria. Each of these animal friends (with the exception of the hermit crabs… there’s just not a whole lot going on there) had such a distinct personality that I can remember our relationship vividly.

Isa St. Clair (Gerty Fail)

Isa St. Clair (Gerty Fail)